Euthanasia Prevention Coalition granted intervenor status in assisted death case

The Court of Appeal of Alberta has granted the Euthanasia Prevention Coalition (EPC) intervenor status in the controversial case of a 27-year-old Calgary woman with autism seeking approval for medical assistance in dying (MAiD) against her father’s wishes. On May 17, the non-profit that opposes assisted suicide submitted a five-page application to intervene containing legal...

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Toronto palliative care forum seeks a ‘narrative of hope’

Amplifying advocacy and pastoral care efforts, bolstering educational resources and championing life-affirming legislation are among the recommendations emerging from an international interfaith symposium on palliative care staged in Toronto late last month. The Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops (CCCB) and the Pontifical Academy for Life (PAV) bestowed health care, medicine, ethics, legal and pastoral care...

Pro-life supporters march in this year’s March for Life in Ottawa. (Peter Stockland photo)

‘I will never forget you’ is national March for Life theme

Thousands of pro-lifers packed onto Parliament Hill and spilled out onto Wellington Street May 9 for the 27th annual National March for Life. The crowd gathered on the Hill at noon with its members bearing both homemade and professionally crafted signs pledging to stand fast for the unborn and vulnerable. The march’s theme “I will never...

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Medically-provided euthanasia: From so-called ‘Compassionate Offer’ to ‘Unspoken Hint’

By Peter Oliver, Catholic Health Association of Saskatchewan In January 2024, the Catholic Health Association of Saskatchewan (CHAS) identified working with the Saskatchewan Bishops to develop a provincial response to medically-provided euthanasia (known as Medical Assistance in Dying or MAiD) as a top priority. Instinctively this felt right, but I’m prone to ask questions and I...

(Unsplash photo) Canadian senators passed a bill officially delayed medical assistance in dying (MAiD) for individuals solely living with a mental illness until March 17, 2027. The Senate passed Bill C-62 at third reading on Feb. 29.

Canada’s Senate pushes MAiD for mentally ill three years down the road

Medical assistance in dying (MAiD) access for individuals solely living with a mental illness is officially delayed until March 17, 2027, as the Senate of Canada passed Bill C-62 at third reading Feb. 29. Senators passed the bill during their last sitting before March 19. It had to pass on Leap Day or else medical...

Protester holds up a sign in preparation for the Feb. 27 rally on Parliament Hill calling for a halt to expanding MAiD to the mentally ill.

More supports, less death, say MAiD opponents at Parliament Hill rally

Speakers at a rally on Parliament Hill demanded the federal government provide more life-saving supports for those deeply suffering from mental illness rather than giving them access to medical assistance in dying (MAiD). Expanding MAiD to people solely on the basis of mental illness was to begin March 17, but Bill C-62 is calling for...

Deacon Larry Worthen speaking at “What Wrong with MAiD?,” a February 8 event in Sherwood Park.

Edmonton Catholics rally against culture of death

Nohl Macdonald is still in high school, but that hasn’t prevented him and many others in the Edmonton Archdiocese from speaking out against the expansion of assisted suicide and euthanasia in Canada. Macdonald was amongst the crowd of more than 500 people (in person and online) who attended a Feb. 8 public lecture to equip Catholics and...

Archbishop Miller welcomed Ottawa’s Jan. 29 decision to delay expanding MAiD to include mental illness but was disappointed that the government plans to proceed at a later date. On Feb. 1, the government paused the expansion for three years. (Alberto Biscalchin photo)

MAiD for mental illness must be stopped, not paused, Catholic and legal experts say

Catholic and anti-euthanasia observers across Canada are welcoming the federal government’s decision to pause the introduction of assisted dying for individuals suffering from mental illness, but expressing dismay that it still intends to expand access in the future. Vancouver Archbishop J. Michael Miller said he was disappointed by an announcement by federal Health Minister Mark...

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